Effect of time and dose of recombinant follicle stimulating hormone agonist on the superovulatory response of sheepby Heloisa M. Rutigliano, Betty M. Adams, Albina Jablonka-Shariff, Irving Boime, Thomas E. Adams

Theriogenology

About

Year
2014
DOI
10.1016/j.theriogenology.2014.05.010
Subject
Equine / Food Animals / Small Animals / Animal Science and Zoology

Text

Accepted Manuscript

Effect of time and dose of recombinant fsh agonist on the superovulatory response of sheep

Heloisa M. Rutigliano , Betty M. Adams , Albina Jablonka-Shariff , Irving Boime ,

Thomas E. Adams

PII: S0093-691X(14)00232-5

DOI: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2014.05.010

Reference: THE 12802

To appear in: Theriogenology

Received Date: 21 January 2014

Revised Date: 2 May 2014

Accepted Date: 9 May 2014

Please cite this article as: Rutigliano HM, Adams BM, Jablonka-Shariff A, Boime I, Adams TE, Effect of time and dose of recombinant fsh agonist on the superovulatory response of sheep, Theriogenology (2014), doi: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2014.05.010.

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Revised 1

EFFECT OF TIME AND DOSE OF RECOMBINANT FSH AGONIST ON THE 2

SUPEROVULATORY RESPONSE OF SHEEP 3

Heloisa M. Rutigliano a 1, Betty M. Adams a, Albina Jablonka-Shariff b, Irving Boime b, 4

Thomas E. Adams a 5 a Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, 6

Davis, CA 95616, USA 7 b Departments of Developmental Biology and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington 8

University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8103, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Saint 9

Louis, MO 63110, USA 10

Correspondent Author: 11

Heloisa M. Rutigliano 12

School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, 13

Utah State University, 4815 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA 14 hrutigliano@gmail.com 15

Telephone number: (559) 623 3756, (435) 797 9877 16

Fax number: (435) 797 2118 17 1

Present address: School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal, Dairy and

Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, 4815 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA

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E-mail address of authors: 18

Betty M. Adams: bmadams@ucdavis.edu 19

Albina Jablonka-Shariff: ajablonka@wustl.edu 20

Irving Boime: iboime@wustl.edu 21

Thomas E Adams: teadams@ucdavis.edu 22

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Abstract 23 24

The objective of this study was to determine the superovulatory potential of a single 25 chain analog of human FSH (Fcα) when administered to ewes either 3 d before, or 26 coincident with, simulated luteolysis (pessary removal; PR). Forty animals were 27 randomly assigned to receive Fcα at doses of 0.62, 1.25 or 2.5 IU/kg of body weight 28 (bwt) 3 d before PR; or 0.31, 0.62, 1.25 or 2.5 IU/kg bwt at PR. Control ewes received 29 protein without FSH activity. Blood samples were collected during the periovulatory 30 period and ovarian tissue was collected 11 d after PR. Ovulation rate did not differ from 31 the control group in ewes receiving the smallest doses of Fcα (0.31 and 0.62 IU/kg). 32

However, a significant superovulatory response was noted in sheep receiving 1.25 and 33 2.5 IU/kg. Although significantly increased relative to the ovulation rate in control 34 animals, the superovulatory response was comparable in animals receiving the largest 35 doses levels of Fcα at, or 3 d before, PR. The interval between PR and the LH surge was 36 significantly extended and the LH surges were less synchronous in animals receiving Fcα 37 at PR when compared with animals receiving the potent FSH agonist 3 d before PR. 38

Taken together, these data indicate that the human single-chain gonadotropin with FSH 39 activity promotes superovulation in ewe lambs in the breeding season. A single injection 40 of the recombinant gonadotropin 3 d before luteolysis synchronizes the LH surge. The 41 use of the single chain analog of FSH in assisted reproduction for domestic animals is 42 likely to be of practical significance as an alternative to conventional gonadotropins in 43 superovulation protocols in livestock species. 44

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Keywords: gonadotropin, ovine, multiple ovulation, single-chain gonadotropin, assisted 45 reproductive techniques 46

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ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 5 1. Introduction 47 48

The reproductive technologies that permit synchronization of estrus, induced 49 ovulation, and multiple ovulation and embryo transfer have been widely used in the 50 livestock industry to increase out-of-season breeding, induce precocious puberty and 51 accelerate the pace of genetic improvement. Many of these manipulations of the normal 52 reproductive process involve the administration of exogenous gonadotropins that 53 stimulate ovarian follicle development and maturation, and ovulation. These stimulatory 54 hormones are generally isolated from tissues of the pituitary glands of pigs and sheep 55 (pituitary FSH and LH), the plasma of pregnant mares (eCG), and the urine of pregnant 56 women (hCG) [1]. 57

Although potent and effective in modulating ovarian activity in laboratory 58 species, the use of tissue-derived gonadotropins in livestock species often is associated 59 with variable ovarian responses. The inconsistent nature of the response in livestock is 60 ascribed to animal-to-animal variation in sensitivity, as well as batch-to-batch variation in 61 purity and potency of tissue-derived gonadotropin preparations [1]. For example, 62

Murphy et al. [2] demonstrated that the FSH activity and the relative proportion of FSH 63 to LH activity in eCG preparations varied between mares and within mares with stage of 64 gestation. Gonadotropins isolated from animal tissue may also be vectors for infectious 65 diseases [3,4]. Additionally, pituitary-derived gonadotropins are cleared very rapidly 66 from the circulation and most of the superovulation protocols recommend repeated 67 administration of FSH preparations at 8 to 12 h intervals over 3 to 4 days [1,5], increasing 68 animal stress and management cost. 69