Size Distribution Behavior of Metallic Iron Particles in Coal-Based Reduction Products of an Oolitic Iron Oreby Yongsheng Sun, Yuexin Han, Peng Gao, Jianwen Yu

Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review

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Size Distribution Behaviour of Metallic Iron Particles in

Coal-Based Reduction Products of an Oolitic Iron Ore

Yongsheng Suna, Yuexin Hana, Peng Gaoa & Jianwen Yua a College of Resources and Civil Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang, China

Accepted author version posted online: 25 Aug 2014.

To cite this article: Yongsheng Sun, Yuexin Han, Peng Gao & Jianwen Yu (2014): Size Distribution Behaviour of Metallic Iron

Particles in Coal-Based Reduction Products of an Oolitic Iron Ore, Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review: An

International Journal, DOI: 10.1080/08827508.2014.955611

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08827508.2014.955611

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Ac ce pte d M an us cri pt 1

Size Distribution Behaviour of Metallic Iron Particles in Coal-based Reduction

Products of an Oolitic Iron Ore

Yongsheng Sun 1, , Yuexin Han 1, , Peng Gao 1 , Jianwen Yu 1 1

College of Resources and Civil Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang, China

Address correspondence to Yongsheng Sun, and Yuexin Han, E-mail: neusunyongsheng@163.com; dongdafulong@mail.neu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The size distribution of metallic iron particles is important to better understand the coal-based reduction mechanisms of refractory iron ores. This study was focused on the particle size distribution behaviour of metallic iron in coal-based reduction products of an oolitic iron ore. The size of metallic iron particles was measured using image analysis, and the data obtained were analysed using frequency and cumulative distributions. The curves of the size-frequency distribution and cumulative passing percentage of metallic iron particles exhibited nearly the same trend with respect to particle size. The particle size distribution of metallic iron particles was markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. The number of metallic iron particles with large size increased with the reduction time and temperature. Goodness of fit tests indicated that the power function and the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the log-normal distribution

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Ac ce pte d M an us cri pt 2 best fitted the experimental data of size frequency distribution and cumulative passing percentage of metallic iron particles, respectively.

KEYWORDS: Metallic iron particle; Particle size distribution; Image analysis;

Coal-based reduction 1. INTRODUCTION

Iron and steel have played significant roles in the development of human civilisation and culture. Steel is a main metallic construction material because of its many properties, such as high strength, toughness, wear and corrosion resistance (Schenk, 2011).

Extracting iron from iron ore is one of the most frequently studied topics in extractive metallurgy. Today, the dominant process used for extracting iron is the blast furnace process. This method requires the iron ore to be upgraded through a series of physical separation processes, including crushing, grinding, separation and dewatering (Srivastava and Kawatra, 2009). The iron concentrate is usually too fine to be directly used in ironmaking, and must be produced into high quality pellets at high temperatures (Halt and Kawatra, 2014; Kawatra and Halt, 2011; Halt et al., 2014; Bolen, 2014). This complex sequence, however, is neither cost-effective nor possible for refractory iron ores (e.g., iron ores with low grades, ultrafine grains, and complicated mineral compositions) that are resistant to physical concentration (Sandvik and Larsen, 2014; Liu et al., 2014;

Carlson and Kawatra, 2013; Haselhuhn, 2013).

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