The Impact of Self-Service Technology and the Presence of Others on Cause-Related Marketing Programs in Restaurantsby Lydia Hanks, Nathan D. Line, Anna S. Mattila

Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management

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Year
2015
DOI
10.1080/19368623.2015.1046536
Subject
Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management / Management Information Systems / Marketing

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Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management

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The Impact of Self-Service Technology and the

Presence of Others on Cause-Related Marketing

Programs in Restaurants

Lydia Hanksa, Nathan D. Linea & Anna S. Mattilab a The Dedman School of Hospitality, Florida State University b The Pennsylvania State University

Accepted author version posted online: 19 May 2015.

To cite this article: Lydia Hanks, Nathan D. Line & Anna S. Mattila (2015): The Impact of Self-Service Technology and the

Presence of Others on Cause-Related Marketing Programs in Restaurants, Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management, DOI: 10.1080/19368623.2015.1046536

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19368623.2015.1046536

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Ac ce pte d M an us cri pt 1

Running Head: Self-Service Technology and the Presence of Others

The Impact of Self-Service Technology and the

Presence of Others on Cause-Related Marketing

Programs in Restaurants

Lydia Hanks

The Dedman School of Hospitality, Florida State University

Nathan D. Line

The Dedman School of Hospitality, Florida State University

Anna S. Mattila

The Pennsylvania State University

Address correspondence to Lydia Hanks, The Dedman School of Hospitality, Florida State

University, 288 Champions Way, UCB 4114, 2855 Apalachee Pkwy., Tallahassee, FL 32306,

USA. E-mail: lhanks@fsu.edu <AQ:>Please confirm this correspondence address is correct and complete as listed

Abstract

Self-service technology (SST) is rapidly gaining traction in the restaurant industry, yet the impact on consumer behavior remains to be seen. This study lends a theoretical perspective to the growing issue of SST and its effect on consumer donation behavior. From the lens of costly signaling theory, we examine how the use of SST impacts guest responses to cause-related marketing (CRM) initiatives. Employing an experimental design, we found that customers who were solicited in the presence of others were more likely to donate than those solicited via SST.

These results suggest that when the participation decision is conspicuous, donating is a way to raise social status in front of others. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no extant research

D ow nl oa de d by [N ew

Y or k U niv ers ity ] a t 0 7:4 8 0 1 A ug us t 2 01 5

Ac ce pte d M an us cri pt 2 has examined the joint impact of SST and matching donations on the customer’s participation in

CRM programs. Our findings suggest that SST adoption may have unintended consequences for corporations.

Keywords: costly signaling theory, corporate social responsibility, cause-related marketing, selfservice technology, restaurants

Introduction

Self-service technology is rapidly gaining traction in the restaurant industry and has the potential to revolutionize nearly every aspect of the dining experience (Beldona, Buchanan, & Miller, 2014; Kimes, 2008). Innovations continue to develop that allow guests to peruse menus, make food selections, customize their orders, request refills, and/or interact with the company in general using either touch-screen kiosks, tableside tablets, or mobile phones. In early 2014,

Chili’s and Applebee’s, two leading U.S. casual dining chains, introduced tablet-based menus with touch-screen capabilities for ordering and paying the check (Quast, 2014). Later that year, the CEO of Panera Bread, a fast-casual dining chain, announced that the company was undertaking a major overhaul of its ordering system by installing self-service, touch-screen stations where customers could order and pay for their food (Strom, 2014).

The extent to which this type of self-service technology will ultimately impact consumer experiences, attitudes, and behavior remains to be seen (Dabholkar & Spaid, 2012). Such technology has the potential to positively impact the customer experience through shorter waiting times, shorter lines, and greater customer control (Dixon, Kimes, & Verma, 2009;